Cost estimates for the Soviet oil industry, 1970 to 1990
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Cost estimates for the Soviet oil industry, 1970 to 1990

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Published by Center for International Research, Bureau of the Census, U.S. Dept. of Commerce in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Soviet Union

Subjects:

  • Petroleum industry and trade -- Soviet Union -- Costs -- Forecasting.,
  • Petroleum industry and trade -- Soviet Union -- Costs -- Statistics.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Albina Tretyakova and Meredith Heinemeier ; edited by Jeanine Braithwaite.
SeriesCIR staff paper ;, no. 20
ContributionsHeinemeier, Meredith M., Braithwaite, Jeanine.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD9555.S652 T75 1986
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 86 p. ;
Number of Pages86
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2494276M
LC Control Number87601293

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The economy of the Soviet Union was based on a system of state ownership of the means of production, – The value of all consumer goods manufactured in in retail According to CIA estimates, by the size of the Soviet economy was roughly half that in the United States. Currency: Soviet ruble (SUR). @article{osti_, title = {Review of the Soviet oil industry in }, author = {Shabad, T. and Sagers, M.J.}, abstractNote = {The recovery of oil production, mainly in West Siberia, the main oil-producing region, was probably the most striking development in the fuel industries in After having declined by 18 million tons, Soviet oil production rose again in by 20 million tons. In Wheel of Fortune: The Battle for Oil and Power in Russia, energy policy analyst Thane Gustafson discusses in great detail the history of the oil industry from the collapse of the Soviet Union to today, and lays out the challenges facing the industry as resources become more difficult to find and produce. Failure to confront these challenges. Oil Industry of the Former Soviet Union - Reserves, Extraction and Transportation: Reserves, Extraction and Transportation [Krylov, N, Boksernan, A., Stavrovsky, E] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Oil Industry of the Former Soviet Union - Reserves, Extraction and Transportation: Reserves, Extraction and TransportationCited by: 2.

In the s, the Western Siberia region, also known as the "Russian Core," made the Soviet Union a major world oil producer, allowing for peak production of million barrels per day in total. Cost estimates for the Soviet gas industry, to / (Washington, D.C.: Center for International Research, Bureau of the Census, U.S. Dept. of Commerce, []), by Albina Tretyakova, Jeanine Braithwaite, and Meredith M. Heinemeier (page images at HathiTrust). The Economics of Soviet Oil and Gas Hardcover – January 1, by Robert Wellington Campbell (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" — Author: Robert Wellington Campbell. Also, the Soviet Union was an oil exporter, and at a lower price, it earned less profit for the oil it exported. Given these headwinds, oil production stopped rising, and by , began to fall.

Lower crude oil prices during the late s, oil being the primary Soviet export, further exacerbated the situation. After record-breaking prices in the early s, there was drastic reduction is price of crude oil, the main Soviet export, during late s and early s after the end of Iraq-Iran War (). quality, accessible oil are depleted, the Soviets are turning to more remote oil and gas fields and more costly exploitation techniques. But they lag badly behind the West in the necessary technology. Without any access to Western equipment, the adverse impact on Soviet oil production could be as high as 10 percent of output by Size: 2MB. English imports of Soviet oil products made up about per cent of England's total oil imports and per cent of imports of those varieties of oil imported from the Soviet Union. The value of Soviet oil exports in , rubles, an increase of nearly 18 per cent over the previous year. Late last year another barter deal was completed with the Soviet Union through which Italy will take some million barrels of Soviet oil between and